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    Counterfeit Awareness

    At Specialized, our love for cycling runs deep and it shows in everything we do. We're just like you - passionate riders who always strive to improve the experience for ourselves and our community.

    Safety is a big deal for us, not just because we ride our own bikes, but because we consider all our customers to be part of our cycling family.

    So you can bet we take it personally when it comes to counterfeit products. That's why we're dedicated to stopping counterfeiters in their tracks. This guide is here to help you identify and steer clear of them.

    What if I've Bought a Counterfeit Product?

    If you even have the slightest suspicion that you've bought a counterfeit product or come across something fishy online, let us know at [email protected]. Why? Because your safety matters to us, and counterfeit products are a huge risk.

    The best way to avoid the counterfeits altogether is to shop at an authorized Specialized Retailer or directly on Specialized.com. That way, you can be sure you're getting safe, authentic Specialized products.

    Find a Retailer

    How Do I Spot a Fake?

    Who's the Seller?

    Is the seller a certified Specialized retailer? Authentic Specialized gear is sold by us, our partnered bike shops, their websites, and authorized retailers on selected e-commerce platforms.

    Price Check

    If a bike or piece of equipment is priced ridiculously low, it's probably a counterfeit, stolen, or part of a scam.

    Product Selection

    Seeing a ton of older designs and colorways? That's a red flag right there.

    Serial Numbers

    If a seller can't provide a serial number, watch out. That's one of the main red flags for a counterfeit or possibly stolen bike.

    Counterfeit Clustering

    Counterfeit goods are often found for sale in clusters. So, be wary if you notice the same questionable individual or e-commerce store selling other frequently counterfeited brands.

    Quality Control

    Counterfeit products often mess up the details. They might get the shape right, but look closer - the paint, small metal and plastic hardware, hangtags, or decals are often off.

    Who's the Seller?

    Is the seller a certified Specialized retailer? Authentic Specialized gear is sold by us, our partnered bike shops, their websites, and authorized retailers on selected e-commerce platforms.

    Serial Numbers

    If a seller can't provide a serial number, watch out. That's one of the main red flags for a counterfeit or possibly stolen bike.

    Price Check

    If a bike or piece of equipment is priced ridiculously low, it's probably a counterfeit, stolen, or part of a scam.

    Counterfeit Clustering

    Counterfeit goods are often found for sale in clusters. So, be wary if you notice the same questionable individual or e-commerce store selling other frequently counterfeited brands.

    Product Selection

    Seeing a ton of older designs and colorways? That's a red flag right there.

    Quality Control

    Counterfeit products often mess up the details. They might get the shape right, but look closer - the paint, small metal and plastic hardware, hangtags, or decals are often off.

    Spotting Scams

    Scams are popping up everywhere these days. So ask yourself: Do the prices seem too good to be true? Does the website list a legitimate business location? Does the "about us" page sound like an actual shop? Can you put unlimited quantities of bikes in your shopping cart?

    Is it Safe to Use Counterfeit Products?

    Counterfeit products often lack the quality and safety standards that go into our genuine Specialized gear.

    Take helmets, for example. A counterfeit helmet might look the part, but it won't offer you the protection you need when it matters most. Fake helmets lack our internal roll cage and do not properly withstand impacts.

    We strongly advise against using counterfeit products - your safety is simply not worth the risk.

    Identifying Counterfeit Products

    This is where things get tricky. Counterfeiters are getting better at their game, but there are still some signs you can look out for. Examples of counterfeit products, and ways to identify them, are shown below (marked by a red X).

    If you’ve purchased a product resembling any counterfeit examples, please contact Specialized Brand Security for authentication.

    Carbon Frames

    Counterfeit bikes are out there, but our global team is reporting that only a few models are commonly faked. Here's what we usually see:

    • Tarmac, Venge, Aethos
    • Stumpjumper FSR, Stumpjumper EVO, Stumpjumper HT
    • Epic, Epic HT, Epic EVO

    On carbon fiber counterfeit frames, look closely at the metal pieces on a frame, and compare it to a real bike often details like the derailleur hangers, headset, and seatpost head are often obviously and completely wrong on a fake bike.

    Aluminum Bikes

    Sometimes, counterfeiters slap on replacement stickers to make cheap aluminum frames look like authentic Specialized bikes.

    The New Specialized App

    Buying a new bike can be stressful without knowing for sure it's an authentic Specialized product. The good news is that checking serial numbers on the new Specialized Ride app (available on the App Store & Google Play Store) allows you to verify your bike's authenticity.

    When using the app, please keep in mind the following:

    • If manually putting in a serial number doesn't give you a picture and a part number in the search result, please get in touch with [email protected] immediately.
    • A real bike will correctly display a photo of the model, production year, and paint job.
    • Do not register a serial number that does not display the correct photo and description in the app.
    • Serial number WSBC605292544K is always fake.
    • Many recent counterfeit serial numbers in the Taramc SL7 fakes look like the photos below. If you're in doubt, contact us at [email protected] and send us photos of your bike, especially close-ups of the hardware, the seat post head, and derailleur hangers.
    Counterfeit Serial Examples

    Fake

    Fake

    Fake

    Helmets
    You'll find quality craftsmanship and safety features in every detail of a genuine Specialized helmet. Counterfeit helmets may look similar, but they're missing essential safety features. Check for labels and the helmet strap Y-connectors. The Specialized logos often looks off compared to a real one, the Y-connector is flat instead of ribbed, and the internal stickers are incorrect.

    Labels

    Counterfeit Prevail helmets often show pin steam vents and are usually labeled with SM/MD sizing rather than horizontal steam vents and MD sizing. SM/MD or Asia Medium sizing does not indicate a fake, in and of itself, but they are incredibly rare outside of Asian or Brazilian markets.

    Helmet Straps

    Counterfeit Prevail and S-Works Evade helmets may have faulty strap construction, incorrect logo orientation or font, and poor-quality stitching.

    Handlebars

    Textures

    Fake Aerofly II, Roval Rapide, and Roval Rapide Cockpit handlebars are easy to spot - the dots on the top of the bars are often completely wrong.

    Graphics

    Counterfeit Aerofly and Venge VIAS handlebars are very flexible. The carbon fibers can be heard crackling during a strong, bare-handed flex test. Sometimes, you can even snap them with your bare hands. Aerofly bars and mountain bike handlebars with large red or silver graphics are certainly counterfeit. Specialized has never made bars with these graphics.

    Cable Routing

    Counterfeit Aerofly bars often have poorly made derailleur cable entry holes. Authentic bars have a visible cable support shelf.

    Jerseys

    Authentic Specialized jerseys do not have other brand logos on the garment unless it is an official pro team jersey, which is very limited. Use commonsense with apparel. Authentic Specialized jerseys and shorts are not sold as a set for suspiciously cheap prices.

    Counterfeit Jersey sellers often display large quantities of older Specialized jersey models, which is not consistent with the selection found on the official Specialized website.

    Shorts, Gloves, Saddles, and Hangtags
    When it comes to shorts, gloves, saddles, and hangtags, counterfeit products usually fall short in quality. Look closely at the construction, materials, logos, and pricing - these can be tell-tale signs of a counterfeit product.

    Shorts

    One way to spot fake shorts is by checking the padding. These knock-offs are typically poorly made and do not properly position the padding to provide riders with maximum comfort. Some may even have the "COOLMAX™" branding on the chamois, even though they don't use that material.

    Gloves

    Differentiating between counterfeit gloves and genuine ones can be done through their pricing. Authentic Specialized gloves usually have a minimum retail price of $25 and above. Logos are another indicator, as phony gloves usually display multiple logos that are either too large or incorrect.

    Saddles

    A bare carbon saddle is a counterfeit product. Authentic Specialized saddles will always have material over the frame.

    Hangtags

    Jerseys and shorts are the most common counterfeit Specialized products and are made in many different countries. One of the easiest ways to identify a counterfeit product is by the tag. Counterfeit products will have poorly-printed hangtags with off-brand colors and fonts.

    Remember

    If you spot something suspicious or you're not sure about a product, get in touch with us at [email protected].

    Your safety and the quality of your ride is our priority.